Editorchat’s Blog

Where writers and editors connect

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We’ve gotten our own hosted site, but not the capability to re-direct to the site.  Kindly direct your browser to http://www.editorchat.net for all the latest transcripts and discussion topics. And don’t forget, we are still hosting LIVE chats every Wednesday night at 8:30pm EST on Twitter.

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Written by LydiaBreakfast

July 14, 2009 at 11:21 am

Posted in Uncategorized

What We Are Discussing on #editorchat on 5/13

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A new survey from temp worker agency Kelly Services says that 26 percent of the population is now self-employed, up from 19 percent in 2006. With news of layoffs in virtually every American industry, it’s a good bet that this additional 7 percent includes unwilling freelancers. It’s certainly true in publishing. Former New Yorker writer Daniel Baum has been tweeting the story behind his firing in detail.

And yet amid the cutbacks is a stated desire among some publishers to produce more content than ever. BusinessWeek‘s John Byrne was on editorchat not long ago talking about filling digital pages through community engagement. We wonder if that’s all there is.

Is community the only way to bridge this emerging content divide, where few writers are asked to do more than ever? Specifically, we’re wondering:

Editors: Are you to trying to find new ways to generate more content, even with mandates to cut staff ?

Writers: Are editors asking you to produce more? What’s changed in your output routine?

Editors: What have you tried that’s worked in bridging the content divide?

Writers: Do you see the content divide as a threat or an opportunity?

For additional reading, take a look at Publishing Executive‘s piece “User Generated Content is Nothing New” and the Editor and Publisher article on the new WSJ code of conduct with regards to staff using Twitter and Facebook for their work

Drop us a comment below and tell us your stories of success or failure in bridging the content divide.  And join us tomorrow night when we’ll chat about these questions and more.

Written by LydiaBreakfast

May 12, 2009 at 1:40 pm

What We’re Talking About on #editorchat tonight 5-6

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We’re back to innovation this week as Amazon unveils its large format Kindle DX, billed as a potential savior of the newspaper industry. We’re not so sure. No doubt publishers are looking for ways to be more innovative, but we’re in the trenches.  What are you doing to move into this next era of publishing?  We want to talk about what has worked, and some things you may have tried recently that haven’t.

Specifically we’re wondering:

Has anyone found a good way to do long form writing?

Editors, what are you doing to engage and work more effectively with writers?

Freelancers, have you changed how you do your queries?

Writers, what have you done to further engage readers?

Has anyone found new and better ways to source (besides HARO) and fact-check?

If you have any other questions, please add them in the comments section and we’ll try to discuss them tonight at 8:30pm EST.

Written by LydiaBreakfast

May 6, 2009 at 7:53 pm

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What We Are Discussing on #editorchat on 4/22

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Julia Angwin, Senior Technology Editor, WSJ.com, The Wall Street Journal, will be our second guest host for #editorchat this Wednesday, April 22, from 8:30-10pm pm EST.   Here are the questions up for discussion:

1) Do you have multiple online identities for your writing life and other parts of your life?
2) Do you feel its important to separate the two parts of your life – personal and professional? Or are they intertwined?
3) How does your online identity (or identities) help or hinder your writing life?
4) If you have multiple identities online how do you separate them? Different usernames? Different services?
5) Do you feel that multiple identities helps you develop multiple audiences? Or is it best to aggregate an audience under one identity?

Julia Angwin is a Pulitzer Prize-winning technology editor and columnist at The Wall Street Journal. She is also the author of “Stealing MySpace: The Battle to Control the Most Popular Website in America” (Random House, March 2009).

She started her journalism career as an intern at The Washington Post, followed by stints at two small wire-services in Washington D.C. She joined the San Francisco Chronicle in 1996, where she was awarded “Outstanding Young Journalist of the Year” by the Northern California chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists and was awarded a Knight-Bagehot fellowship in journalism for studies at Columbia Business School.

In 2000, she joined the Wall Street Journal and began covering technology and the dot-com boom from an East Coast perspective. In 2003, she was on a team of reporters at The Wall Street Journal that was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in Explanatory Reporting for coverage of corporate corruption.

Written by LydiaBreakfast

April 21, 2009 at 1:42 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

NEWS: Julia Angwin, Senior Technology Editor, WSJ.com to Guest Host

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We are thrilled to announce Julia Angwin, Senior Technology Editor, WSJ.com, The Wall Street Journal, will be our second guest host for #editorchat this Wednesday, April 22, from 8:30-10pm pm EST. More details to come but, in the meantime, see below for Julia’s bio and mark your calendars.

Julia Angwin is a Pulitzer Prize-winning technology editor and columnist at The Wall Street Journal. She is also the author of “Stealing MySpace: The Battle to Control the Most Popular Website in America” (Random House, March 2009).

She started her journalism career as an intern at The Washington Post, followed by stints at two small wire-services in Washington D.C. She joined the San Francisco Chronicle in 1996, where she was awarded “Outstanding Young Journalist of the Year” by the Northern California chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists and was awarded a Knight-Bagehot fellowship in journalism for studies at Columbia Business School.

In 2000, she joined the Wall Street Journal and began covering technology and the dot-com boom from an East Coast perspective. In 2003, she was on a team of reporters at The Wall Street Journal that was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in Explanatory Reporting for coverage of corporate corruption.

Written by LydiaBreakfast

April 17, 2009 at 2:26 pm

What We’re Talking About on #editorchat on 4/15

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Meet us at our NEW TIME *8:30-10pm EST* when we’ll talk about the following:

Last week, we kicked off a series about innovation in publishing and what it means for writers and editors. We continue this week by looking at the Dark Side. Community publishing sites such as Helium often pay writers the least and eschew editors. Maybe we’re too old, but we can’t imagine writing successfully without an editor close by.

We also wonder if well-publicized efforts to reinvent the very idea of what makes a book is good for the book publishing industry. Innovation is often good. Innovation may help save the publishing industry from itself. But is all innovation good, or even necessary?

Not long ago we posted an excerpt of a speech given by New York Times Magazine editor Gerald Marzorati at the 2009 CASE Editors’ Forum in which he expressed concerns that the business models — or lack thereof — for newer mediums (i.e., Web and mobile Internet) are threatening to kill long-form journalism. Days later, Gawker published the resignation letter of The Wall Street Journal’s Joshua Prager, in which he expressed similar concerns. Thus, we ask:

Writers: How has technology or business innovation disrupted your process? Do you write more? Less? With the same verve?

Editors: Has the Web and mobile Internet changed what you ask of your writers? Are you placing limits on them, as Prager suggests? If not, is creativity paying off in a business sense?

Community engagement may be the key to news and, perhaps, to publishing in general (i.e., look at how the Harry Potter series opened doors for community building) but where is the line drawn between writer, editor and community? is it really good for writers if community members are writing their own content?

We always hear of how innovation is driving down revenue and, therefore, pay in publishing. Is that always true, or there are success stories that we are ignoring?

Written by LydiaBreakfast

April 8, 2009 at 12:10 pm

What We’re Talking About on #editorchat 4/1

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We’re not going the April Fools route today – this edition of #editorchat will be the real deal.

After stimulating discussions on the digital divide and the future of media led by BusinessWeek’s John Byrne in our last #editorchat, Tim and I decided to keep that conversation going in a multi-part series. A Pew study indicates that writers of online content are more optimistic than their print peers. So, if we ride that optimism and agree that the online realm is the wave of the publishing future, the next item up for discussion is: what are the necessary innovation(s) writers and editors must make to produce profitable business models.

The questions we have for this week are:

When creating online content, should writers have to become SEO experts, in order to craft stories that can be searchable to gain readership?

Editors: How important are embedded links in stories? Do you encourage links to other sites or only back to your own content?

The most successful online publishing is community-oriented, which is by nature, more conversational. Writers and editors, how informal can your stories be? Are first person accounts really that engaging?

What innovations have you seen work? What hasn’t?

Editors: Are you getting pressure from your publishers to be more innovative with information gathering, presentation, and style?

As always, we welcome additions to this list. Please post them as a comment and if we don’t get to it this week, we’ll pick it up next time.

Written by LydiaBreakfast

April 1, 2009 at 4:12 pm